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Update-y bits

Posted on 2008.05.06 at 16:49
Master Broom posted his pictures from Mudthaw, and while I haven't DLed all of them, I wanted to show off the handsewn (with linen thread and a Roman Needle) stola I made.

stola

Also at Carolingian cooks guild a week or so ago, I made the beets with mustard sauce recipe again, this time with the mustard I made based off of Columella's instructions. the week between the making of the mustard and Cooks Guild did mellow out the mustard quite a bit (I wasn't swearing after I tried some).

Speaking of Mudthaw, I showed the shoes, the Equestrian tunics and lacernae, the stola and the beets with mustard sauce. Pictures to follwo.

Comments:


banchomarba1
banchomarba1 at 2008-05-06 21:02 (UTC) (Link)
Close up of stitches, please. and how did you do that neckline? it looks like a "V".

XXOO
redsbragbook
redsbragbook at 2008-05-06 21:07 (UTC) (Link)
It is a V! What you can't tell from that picture is that there's a seam up the center front and the center back, with an opening for my head, and then pleated the widths at the shoulders. There's a statue that I have a picture of on my home computer where the stola is an obvious V, and that's the simplest way I can think of to make it happen.

I made this one that same way:

me
banchomarba1
banchomarba1 at 2008-05-06 21:31 (UTC) (Link)
Yes yes yes! Good sense is not new.
I presume that you know of this page.
http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/cloth/bockhome.html

And from there, we can see this neck line- the vertical slit.
http://www.forest.gen.nz/Medieval/articles/garments/Kragelund/Kragelund.html

And yes, the vertical slit is structurally more sound when it is part of a seam instead of a slash in fabric. Although the extant example is late(for us!), it is referenced in Early Medieval art work that shows this very clever design idea. It cam also be easily woven into a garment- like the Coptic tunics that were woven to shape.

I have been making all of Mr. Man's under/fight tunics with this style of neck for over a year now. He reports that they work much better in terms of stying up on the shoulders. Also- the wear and tear is less and the exposure to sun is less so no more redneck Trimarians here!

Very pretty picture.

If I ever go to an event again, I may just have to figure out a way to impose myself on you. We are so like minded.
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